Humperdinck’s Hänsel und Gretel @ Bozar

A breathtaking performance: The conductor leads the motivated orchestra wonderfully, bringing to light the varied palette of colours of Humperdinck’s score. The singers sang a concert performance but behind the orchestra a screen showed a mix of projections, shadow puppetry and life acting which was all done and performed life outside the stage and projected same-time onto the screen. The effects were stunning. The creators brought me into a  magical fairy tale world showing that lower budget productions can be as enjoyable as famous-name productions. I, anyway, was fascinated. The singers sang well adding their bit to a marvellous evening.

 

Muzikale leiding-Lothar Koenigs, Live projections-Manual Cinema, Peter-Dietrich Henschel, Gertrud-Natascha Petrinsky, Hansel-Gaelle Arquez, Gretel-Talia Or, Die Knusperhexe-Georg Nigl, Sandmännchen und Taumannchen-Ilse Eerens

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Berlioz – Requiem @ Bozar

MI0001454913“Following my usual suspicion, I stayed behind Habeneck and, turning my back towards him, I watched the group of timpanists, which he could not see, the moment approaching when they would all take part in the piece. There are perhaps a thousand bars in my Requiem. But precisely during the one I just mentioned, the one where the movement expands, the one in which the brass instruments launch their terrible fanfare, on the main bar in which the action of the conductor is absolutely essential, Habeneck lowers his conducting stick, quietly takes his snuff box and started to take a pinch of snuff. I always had an eye on him; at that moment I quickly turn around, rush in front of him, I extend my arm and I mark the four main tempi of the new movement. The orchestras follow me, everything is in order, I conduct the piece to the end, with the effect that I had hoped for. When, with the last words of the choir, Habeneck sees the Tuba mirum rescued “What a cold blood’ he said, “without you we would have been lost!” – Yes, I know, I replied, staring at him. I did not add a word … Did he do it on purpose? … Is it possible that this man, in agreement with Mr. XX., who hated me, and friends of Cherubini, would dare to meditate and attempt to commit such a low villainy? … I do not dare to think … But I do not doubt it. God forgive me if I insult him”

This was the account that Berlioz gave in his Memoires when his Requiem was first performed. …”terrible fanfare” he mentions…. but there was no such thing in the Bozar. Especially in the tuba mirum I expect the heaven to open, the earth to part, the blinds to see, the toupets to fly and the elderly to hear. No such thing. In fact had I not read the score, I would not have known that there are 4 extra brass bands, as I did not properly hear them. I barely did in fact and only because they were slightly out of sync. Maybe the orchestral forces should have followed Berlioz’ advise: On top of the 400 musicians that are required “if space permits one can double or triple the vocal mass and increase the orchestral mass proportionally”. Of the 400 required I counted around 200 which one can argue whether they were able to give the requested effect.

But except for the fact that the Requiem was a bit too well-behaved, everybody involved was excellent. The chorus powerful, the orchestra adequate. The tenor Steve Davislim had audible difficulties with the extreme top notes but he has the benefit of replacing his colleague last minute. The music was sublime. It is always a joy to hear such wonderful pieces as the Rex tremendae, the Lacrimosa and the Dies irae and I am pleased that the La Monnaie/De munt put this work on the program.

Music direction-Alain Altinoglu, Chorus direction-Martino Faggiani, Tenor-Steve Davislim, Orchestra-De Munt Symphony Orchestra, Chorus-De Munt, De Munt Academy, Vlaams Radio Koor

midSUMMER MOZARTiade, Brussels, July 2016

UntitledSo, coming back to the BOF, which was first announced and then cancelled. It started as Brussels Opera Festival but now it is presented as midSUMMER MOZARTiade… Not two opera’s anymore but one: Le nozze di Figaro, staged at the Park Theatre with young and very promising singers. So certainly something to look forward to.

Instead of the second opera we will see “A servants’ ball”, which is explained, with a letter by Mozart, as “facchinata”. Facchinata is, as Mozart himself explains in a letter to his sister (Milan, 3rd March 1770), “eine Mascherada, die facchinad, welche schön zu sehen ist, weil sich leüte anlegen als facchin, oder als hausknecht, und da ist ein barca gewesen, wo vielle drin waren, und viel sind auch zu fuße gegangen, 4 oder 6 Chör Trompeten und paucken, und auch etliche kör geigen, und andere Instrumenten” (a masqued ball, that`s wonderful to watch as people dress up as facchini or household servants, and there was a barca (boat?) with lots of people in it, and there were also lots of people on foot, 4 or 6 choirs of trumpets and timpani, and several choirs of violins and other instruments). Well, this seemed promising. But then the program mentions “Voice & piano recitals”. So not a facchinata? Then why mention the letter? On the bright side, the facchinata will be held in the Lorraine Room of the Cercle Royal Gaulois Artistique et Litteraire, “the pleasure garden of Brussels” which will give us a possibility to visit the venue.

masquerade-frolic-scott-jonesAnother happening will be “Mozart in the air”, a set of concerts in the Brussels Royal Park. There is no program to understand who or what we will hear. But the organizers still have a full year to prepare it and fill the internet with plenty of information. I am certainly looking forward to it so let’s them all wish all the best and a happy start in July 2016. For more information visit the festival’s website http://www.amadeusandco.be/en/

I cannot refrain from mentioning the little professionalism in giving indications on how to get a ticket. When calling the only available number one is instructed (in French only) to leave a message….

Un ballo in maschera @ De Munt/La Monnaie

ballo_maschera_091-1024x614In an interview Alex Ollé from La Fura dels Baus declares that he expected a more political dimension in the libretto of Un ballo in maschera. He sees conspiracy and political intriguing in it. He states that if Verdi would have been able to write the plot as he wished the libretto would contain more politcis. Ehmmm, really?…. In a letter to his librettist Antonio Somma we find him describing the subject for his new opera: Un soggetto bello, originale, interessante, con bellissime situazioni ed appassionato: passioni sopra tutto!…». So passions above all. In a subsequent letter he requires a libretto which is: «quieto, semplice, tenero: una specie di Sonnambula senz’essere un’imitazione della Sonnambula», “calm, simple and sweet: like a Sonnambula withouth being an imitation of Sonnambula“. No politics. However what Alex Ollé does well is to add a dramaturgic parallel without deranging the plot. Sure, Orwell’s 1984 isn’t a complete mismatch, under the totalitarian government of Riccardo (but then I tend to disagree, didn’t Verdi want to picture him as wise and enlightened?), just a bit monotone with its mask, its grey concrete slabs etc.

The singers were all honest professionals with adequate voices and Carlo Rizzi directed with insight as much as the score allowed. All in all a satisfactory evening on which I have to agree with the two ladies next to me, which stated “..not too bad this Ballo, compared to the things we usually see in Brussels” 🙂

Concept-Alex Ollé, Music direction-Carlo Rizzi, Staging collaboration-Valentina Carrasco, Set design-Alfons Flores, Costumes-Lluc Castells, Lighting-Urs Schönebaum, Video-Emmanuel Carlier, Gustav III-Stefano Secco, René Ankarström-George Petean, Amelia-Maria José Siri, Ulrica-Marie-Nicole Lemieux, Oscar-Kathleen Kim, Cristiano-Roberto Accurso, Ribbing-Tijl Faveyts, Horn-Carlo Cigni, Un giudice-Zeno Popescu, Un servo-Pierre Derhet

Don Giovanni (Brussels), Lucia di Lammermoor (Verona), Così fan tutte (Ghent)

don n giovanni1The Don Giovanni in Brussels under the direction of Warlikowski was awful. I recommend  this director to read the libretto the next time. Da Ponte’s libretto offers a multitude of double meaninsg. No need to descends into pornography just for the sake of it. Musically things were not exciting either with a very disappointing Barbara Hannigan as Donna Anna. As much as she is acclaimed in modern music, she didn’t convince me at all in the classical style. I couldn’t find full enjoyment in any of the other singers (Don Giovanni-Jean-Sebastien Bou, Il commendatore-Sir Willard White, Don Ottavio-Topi Lehtipuu, Donna Elvira-Rinat Shaham, Leporello-Andreas Wolf, Masetto-Jean-Luc Balestra, Zerlina-Julie Mathevet) Don Giovanni never seemed such a drag…..

 

I rather preferred the Lucia di Lammermoor in Verona, which, with its thrifty set, gave a more complete and satisfying reading than the Mozart opera. Musically wonderful with a (to me) unknown Maria Grazia Schiavo who sang with a full deep  and a good upper register. The slightly unpitched top notes from the first two musical pieces didn’t affect the overall thrilling performance. An equally wonderful Piero Pretti as Edgardo and a very good Marco di Felice as Enrico made this a lovely afternoon. The cast was completed by Alessandro Scotto di Luzio as Arturo, Sim Insung as Raimondo, Elisa Balbo as Alisa and Francesco Pittari as Normanno.

 

cosi1A quite boring night in Gent with Cosi fan tutte followed in January. Musically not very convincing. A very good Dorabella and Guglielmo (Maria Kataeva and Riccardo Novaro), an acceptable Fiordiligi and Despina (Christina Pasaroiu Aylin Sezer) an inadequate Don Alfonso and Ferrando (Umberto Chiummo and Sebastien Droy) and a drab conductor (Jan Schweiger) make this evening rather easy to forget. Was it not for the director… Guy Joosten spoiled yet another Mozart opera. I am totally in the dark when it comes to understand what this amateur is trying to tell us in Mozart (or in any opera for that matter). The scenes are filled with slapstick and inconsistent ideas that could be used (and be equally out of place) in any other opera. Joosten hits the bottom when he made Despina awaken the two lovers by hitting them with the Mesmer stone in the groin. No idea what to do with the singers either when they don’t sing except letting them sit or stand still. The set is lovely (the bar/reception of a hotel) though not consistent (“in casa mia” sings Fiordiligi, which is not translated into subtitles. Are they the hotel owners?)

 

Cecilia Bartoli – St. Pietersburg in Brussels

Bartoli pietersburgBartoli’s fans have the numbers but her detractors are loud. And although I myself adored her in the beginning of her career I was not always fully convinced of her interpretation in later years. Nonetheless I must say I loved the recital given in Brussels. The evening opened with an orchestral piece. And while the pompous ouverture dazzled towards its end the doors fling open and a white dressed Bartoli appears reaching the middle of the stage exactly in the moment the orchestra plays its final chord. It’s this kind of tacky things that Bartoli’s fans seem to love. Similarly, after an aria di furore she storms off the stage and out the door while the orchestra finishes. No big harm though. All her idea’s are a vast artistic and cultural process able to elicit curiosity. This was the case for Sacrificium, for Mission and many others. And it is the same for St Petersburg, an album dedicated to composers who wrote for the Russian court in the 18th century. From a nightly calm with chirping birds, through the mentioned aria di furore and the dramatic Vado a morire, to the duets with the solo instruments and a dueling contest with the trombone, I find her program very balanced with a wide variety of affetti. Bartoli surmounts the difficult coloratura with insouciant ease and interprets every single piece with the depth that characterizes her. Every word, every syllable has a meaning. And that she is still able to pronounce so clearly that I could understand everything even in the 5th row from the back on the second balcony makes her a remarkable artist able to move me with every single piece.

Sure the upper register is not very full and the move to a soprano register made her voice lose some body but the difference with previous years is that she returns to the calmer interpretation that I admired so often. Gone are the hyperactive body movements, gone the exaggerated sighs. What I found was an artist who serves the music with refined interpretation and creativity. Diego Fasolis and his I barocchisti are a perfect match.

Daphne at The Munt/La Monnaie

c1 (2)I tend to avoid the filth of downtown Brussels but during an opera evening one can’t. And being on the square of the Munt is like being in a dump: homeless people roaming through the garbage, broken glass, plastic trash (used bags, wraps, bottles), newspapers, people spitting on the floor, a whiff of urine. The square itself was refurbished less than a year ago in a perfect example of a city’s sterilization. Worst of all is the 70’s office building across the square on what was once a beautiful example of old-Brussels. It must have given, however, the idea of the huge staircase that dominated the scene in Guy Joosten’s interpetation of Daphne. Within this enormous staircase (one set of stairs up to half the height of the stage, the other splitting in two up to the very top) was an equally huge tree, one could only see the immense stem and its branches. it seemed like the over-winning of nature over modern civilization, or, worse, the other way round. Go figure. The setting is Wall-Street-like, with Daphne fighting against a herd of ipod-carrying businessmen. The overall sight was quite impressive but the idea was not reasoned out.  And this is what bothers me with mediocre stage directors: an idea thrown in with very little or no dramatic continuity. And very quickly boredom comes up, interrupted only by several silly ideas (the satyr-looking guests on stilts with a strap-on dildos and Daphne’s mother as a drunk air hostess-lookalike, just to mention two). The singers however deliver a very good performance. Sally Matthews doesn’t charm with the timbre but is a very convincing Daphne. Eric Cutler is a heroic-sounding Apollo, Peter Lodahl and Iain Paterson fittingly interpret Leukippos and Peneios. I also likeed Birgit Remmert’s low notes. Tineke van Ingelgem and Maria Fiselier convincingly deliver their parts of the two maids. Lothar Koenigs’ directorial intentions are admirable but not followed by the orchestra which plays with a limited dynamic range.

Guillaume Tell @ De Munt/La Monnaie

About two performances I did not report. One was the lovely Bohème at the Metropolitan Opera of New York, where Kovalevska, Lungu and Calleja all gave their best. Most memorable for me, however, was the enthusiasm of the American public, who carefully followed the text and reacted with laughter and clapping to show their appreciation and enthusiasm. It’s the kind of public we sometimes miss in Europe, where opera is sometimes just an occasion to be seen. Public is also more critic towards, well…almost everything (especially the Italians :-)), rather then just enjoy the performance. Of course this is sometimes due to a more traditional staging in the US than Europe…but here I open a whole new door….
I open a sidebar to praise and recommend the small and cosy Japanese restaurant Minca (536 E 5th St) where I had the best vegetarian Ramen I have ever tasted.

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Another beautiful show was Janacek’s Jenufa at De Munt in Brussels. The director Alvis Hermanis presented Act 1 of the action with the singers at the front of the stage, while at their back the stage was horizontally divided in half with traditional-style dancing at the bottom. On the top, beautiful colorful pictures link the story. Sometimes the screen would lift to show us the chorus, also in beautiful costumes. This is in opposite contrast to Act 2, where Hermanis transports us into a cold, communist-like setting of the 60’s. Although much criticised, this setting worked well for me, it kind of led me towards the drama which was about to unfold. This is not really my musical territory but I liked all the singers, among which i want to single out the Jenufa of Sally Matthews, the Laca of Charles Workman, Nick Spence as Steva and Carole Wilson as Kostelnicka. All together a wonderful experience. Mr Morlot, in an interview he claimed Jenufa is among his top 10 prefereed opera’s, was also more inspired than usual.

IMG-20140305-00322And now to Guillaume Tell. This is the 4th time I hear this opera in the last 11 months. But the music still amazes and moves me. The libretto is in its infancy of Grand Opéra and somehow a bit tedious. So let’s concentrate on the music and the performance at De Munt. Personally I think Evelino Pidò did a great job. He accompanied the singers well, gave them all the time to carve their interpretation, to develop their musical phrases. On rare occasions I would have wished the orchestra would follow Pidò’s gesticulation when he urged the orchestra to play piano (Sombre forêt), but otherwise the orchestra was in good shape with a delicate English horn, a sound brass, and a motivated timpani player, and accompanied well. The chorus was equally inspired and had an excellent diction, although I am always missing a bit of zest in the Italian repertoire in orchestra and chorus (and I consider Rossini as Italian also in his Paris years).
The bass Nicola Alaimo has not a big voice but rendered a very convincing interpretation of Guillaume and a moving Sois immobile. I found Michael Spyres in much better shape than in Wildbad. His diction is excellent and hearing him sing makes look Arnold’s part like a piece of cake. But the tessitura for the heroic Arnold, which Spyres interprets with vigor rather then boldness, lies very high, and Spyres resolves this with a cleverly used mixed voice.  I was less satisfied about Ermonela Jaho’s Mathilde. Nothing REALLY dramatically wrong vocally (although her coloratura in the Act III aria was very smudged), just her interpretation did not convince me. I particularly enjoyed Nora Gubisch’s luscious mezzo, Eerens’ clear soprano, Marco Spotti’s authoritative Walter Furst (in both the approach of the character and voice), the assertive and full-voiced Gesler of Vincent Le Texier and Julien Dran’s secure acuti of the fisherman Ruodi. Jean-Luc Balestra has a very strong and powerful, smooth voice, which, when skillfully used, can be adapted to a wide range of characters and emotions. I was less taken by Roberto Covatta’s Rodolphe.
All in all an evening above average with the Brussels public at its most typical, with no or hardly any applause during the opera (applause at the end of Arnold’s Act IV aria sounded like one applauds von Winter’s chamber music) with the a few “obbligato” bravo-shrieks.

La Boheme, The Metropolitan Opera NY, Conductor-Stefano Ranzani, Production-Franco Zeffirelli, Costumes-Peter J. Hall, Lighting-Gil Wechsler, Mimi-Maija Kovalevska, Musetta-Irina Lungu, Rodolfo-Joseph Calleja, Marcello-Alexy Markov, Schaunard-Joshua Hopkins, Colline-Christian van Horn, Benoit/Alcindoro-Donald Maxwell, Officer-Joseph Turi, Sergeant-Jason Hendrix, Parpignol-Daniel Clark Smith, 18/01/2014
Jenufa, De Munt Brussels, Muzikale Leiding-Ludovic Morlot, Regie en decor-Alvis Hermanis, Kostuums-Anna Watkins, Belichting-Gleb filshtinsky, Video-Ineta Sipunova, Jenufa-Sally Matthews, Laca Klemen-Charles Workman, Steva Buryja-Nick Spence, Kostelnicka Buryjovka-Carole Wilson, Starek-Ivan Ludlow, Rychtar-Alexander Vassiliev, Rychtarka-Mireille Capelle, Karolka-Hendrickje van Kerckhove, Pastuchnyna-Beata Murowska, Jano-Chloé Briot, Barena-Nathalie van de Voorde, Tetka-Maria Beretta, 24/01/2014
Guillaume Tell, De Munt, Music direction-Evelino Pidò, Chorus direction-Martino Faggiani, Guillaume Tell-Nicola Alaimo, Hedwige-Nora Gubisch, Jemmy-Ilse Eerens, Mathilde-Ermonela Jaho, Arnold-Michael Spyres, Melchtal-Jean Teitgen, Gesler-Vincent Le Texier, Walter Furst-Marco Spotti, Ruodi-Julien Dran, Leuthold-Jean-Luc Balestra, Rodolphe-Roberto Covatta, 05/03/2014

Hamlet by Thomas @ De Munt/La Monnaie

P1030054Not a highlight as I had hoped. Marc Minkowski and Olivier Py re-united to repeat the wonderful experience of les Huguenots a few years back..? Hardly. At least not Py’s direction. Large black brick stairs, wide as the whole scene almost, open the opera. Throughout the plot the stairs move in different directions and position to change the stage into the required setting. On paper it all sounds quite clever… was it not for the brick as material, painted black. It’s just too much black, and the painted bricks just give an impression of something old and cheap…as if someone would paints its walls and paint over the sockets. But black was all the monotonous rest as well, and one had the impression of being in a shady cruising area. The chorus was an annoying something one has to put up with, I had the impression, as often it was standing like, well, a chorus, instead of taking part in the action. The rest, not very original, were Py’s all time classics (half-naked men, leather, dog masks….) mixed with some highlights (Hamlet’s “glitterface” dead father).
mmLuckily the musical part was much better. The orchestra of De Munt/La Monnaie, for once, played lusciously and expressively under the baton of Marc Minkowski (how come HE is able to get those sounds out of the orchestra…?). Pacing and style were spot on. MM gets the orchestra to go from vigorous to tender in no time and directs the somewhat uninspired music perfectly.
The singers all did a fair good job. My only reserve goes to Grupposo (replacing a suffering Jennifer Larmore), who seems to loose control in the higher area of her voice, but renders a very motivated queen Gertrude. Lenneke delivers a controlled but touching mad scene and Laertes’ short role is ideally sung by Remy Mathieu. Claudius’ voice was dark enough to interpret the villain and the title role, sung by Stéphane Degout, one of the rising stars of opera, although personally he never really convinces me, sings correctly and he connects with the character, delivering a convincing Hamlet. Smaller roles all sang well.

Muzikale leiding-Marc Minkowski, Regie-Olivier Py, Decors en kostuums-Pierre-André Weitz, Belichting-Bertrand Killy, Claudius-Vincent Le Texier, Le Reine Gertrude-Sylvie Brunet-Grupposo, Hamlet-Stephane Degout, Polonius-Till Fechner, Ophélie-Lenneke Ruiten, Laerte-Remy Mathieu, Horatio-Henk Neven, Marcellus-Gijs van der Linden, Le spectre du feu Roi-Jerome Varnier

Una porcheria tedesca (or La Clemenza di Tito) by W. A. Mozart @ De Munt/La Monnaie

incendio-roma-64-031791 is an important year in Mozart’s life. It’s the year where he composes Die Zauberflöte, the Requiem, the clarinet concerto, his last piano concerto (nr 27) and it is also the year of his death. The clarinet concerto was written for Anton Stadler, a clarinet virtuoso who also played the obbligato clarinet parts in La clemenza di Tito (there are two of them in this opera, one for Sesto’s aria “Parto, parto…” and one for Vitellia’s rondo “Non piu di fiori”).

Prague, 6 September 1791, just a few hours after the coronation of the emperor Leopold II as King of Bohemia: La clemenza di Tito, opera composed by W. A. Mozart for the coronation festivities has its premiere at the Estates Theatre in Prague (the same theatre as Don Giovanni, 4 years earlier). The public gave it a cool reception, the emperor loved it (or the soprano, more likely), his royal wife belittles it as Una porcheria tedesca (“German crap” or “swinishness”).  As does the court diarist (….: “At 5 o’clock to the theatre in the Old Town, to the opera which is given by the Estates [the government of Bohemia] […] The court did not arrive until after 7:30 and we were regaled with the most tedious spectacle, La clemenza di Tito). This was the start of a criticism hard to die.

titoThough it had some decent success in the following years, la Clemenza was always regarded as an “old fashioned”, “cold” opera, a piece of “stale routine”. This was probably due to Metastasio’s libretto, a didactic plot in which betrayal, treachery, and political machination end with the example of the ruler who forgives everybody and rules with wisdom and humanity.  Partly maybe to the two already mentioned “Non piu di fiori” and “Parto, parto“, which were regarded as mere concert pieces and therefore emotionally detached from the singers’ characters. Undoubtedly it is different to the opera’s composed by Mozart in the previous years. A nostalgic look back to the opera seria? Maybe, but the mastery with which Mozart crafts the single pieces has an astonishing dramatic approach and, as Mozart’s first biographer Niemetschek already saw…”a sense of characterization and delicate taste”. (Just listen to the Terzetto “Vengo…aspettate….”, the following quintet which closes the first act, and Sesto and Vitellia’s aria’s). This was in part also thanks to Caterino Mazzolà, who took the libretto written by Metastasio, shortened it from three to two acts, added ensembles instead of only aria’s and worked with Mozart to add a theatrical grip and emotional complexity more adequate to the time. In our time, one recognizes and appreciates Mozart’s style in almost all pieces. How not appreciate the short (less than a minute) duettino between Sesto and Annio,  the delicate and moving S’altro che lacrime, and the monstruous “Non piu di fiori“, who demands a quick coloratura, lyrical singing and an enourmous range (low G to high D). In this example Della Jones does an excellent job.

Ensemble-wise the quintet who closes Act I is a masterpiece. It depicts a fire on the Capitoline Hill. The characters enter one by one and take up the same melodial phrase as they arrive, in different keys, both major and minor. Between these fall the cries of the chorus, who is off stage. The orchestral mass breaks in, leads to various key changes to a brilliantly conceived Andante, almost a funeral march (after all Tito is believed to be stabbed to death), which closes act I in piano.

The singers are pretty good altogether. Although Alexandrina Pendatchanska (or Alex Penda as she likes to be called today) has a tight vibrato and a somewhat metallic edge  which makes her pronunciation difficult to understand, she acts very well and pulls off the role quite well, using often her chest voice, which I don’t dislike. Tito is Charles Workman who has an excellent pronunciation. His voice slightly strained in the very high notes is powerful and he moves and acts with ease. Although his coloratura is not flawless, his sings and acts convincingly. Simona Saturova is perfect. A wonderfully sweet and impeccable Servilia, her whole register is equally smooth, her voice round and fluid, and Mozart and his contempararies fit her voice excellently. Alex esposito sings in the small role of Publio which seems under his capacities. I wish Peter de Caluwe would use the fee and pay Esposito for some Rossini serio. Sesto and his friend Annio are Michele Losier who has a nice timbre and Frances Bourne who complete the sextet. They both sing acceptably

IMG-20131011-00129The setting by Ivo van Hove is one room (bedroom and bureau) with colours kept in dark brown, mostly. The whole action is also filmed. Vitellia and Sesto mainly from above, the others side wise. However, the filming adds little to the concept. Moving as it is in Servilia’s joy and Tito’s understanding looks, it is pointless in the rest of the opera. Furthermore van Hove seems to have difficulties in knowing what to do with the singers on stage. There is very little movement and the little there is is oddly conventional.
And yet this would all be acceptable, if the musical direction would be satisfactory. But Ludovic Morlot is like I remember him in Cosi fan tutte: he beats time like a Chinese lucky cat: this results in the music being tedious, slow and without pulsating vigor.

Music direction-Ludovic Morlot, Director-Ivo van Hove, Scenography-Jan Versweyveld, Costumes-An D’Huys, Video-Tal Yarden, Dramaturgy-Janine Brogt and Reinder Pols, Tito Vespasiano-Charles Workman, Vitellia-Alex Penda, Servilia-Simona Saturova, Sesto-Michele Losier, Annio-Frances Bourne, Publio-Alex Esposito, Orchestra and Chorus of De Munt/La Monnaie, 11 october 2013