Tancredi @ Brussels

It’s always a pleasure to hear Rossini’s Tancredi, the effort Rossini put into the composition is evident, especially in the women’s arias and duets. For the premiere at the Teatro la Fenice in Venice in 1813 he had two leading ladies: Adelaide Malanotte as Tancredi and Elisabetta Manfredini as Amenaide, the latter sang in Ciro in Babilonia a year earlier and Rossini would also compose the soprano part for her in Sigismondo and Adelaide di Borgogna. The team put together for the two evenings in Brussels, one with the happy ending written for Venice and one with the Ferrara ending (where Tancredi dies at the end) is somewhat heterogeneous. Giuliano Carella was the conductor and he conducted as usual, with vitality and verve. At times the precision of the singers’ coloratura suffered from tempi that were too speedy. But overall there were no drops in tension. The orchestra was not disastrous but not far from it either: I felt that as simple as the accompaniment can be in Italian opera, the more difficult it is to sound appropriate. In this respect the orchestra sounded quite mechanical, no nuance, no subtlety had to be expected, and in vain were Carellas gestures to play more piano. What lacked in Marie-Nicole Lemieux was the coloratura, quite unsatisfactory, but there is not too much of it in Tancredi and what one can appreciate is the beautiful chest register which Lemieux uses unsparingly. Evident is the big personality but the interpretation is questionable and the important final aria before the happy ending does not fully convince. I much enjoyed Salome Jicia as Amenaide although this part requires a higher soprano (as all parts do written for the Manfredini) and the picchettati in the beautiful aria in act 2 put her under strain in terms of precision and intonation as well as the cabaletta of her entrance aria but this was in part due to Carella’s tempi. Very well Enea Scala. Although no ringing voice, there was a beautiful research in colours and easy coloratura paired with an impeccable pronunciation. Nonetheless I’d much prefer him not to choose for the higher top notes’ option as they have the tendency to sound a bit harsh. Excellent Blandine Staskiewicz in the small role of Roggiero, I thought her aria in act 2 was impeccable. A bit subdued Lena Belkina as Isaura. Very unrefined was Ugo Guagliardo’s singing as Orbazzano.

Director-Giuliano Carella, choir leader-Martino Faggiani, Argirio-Enea Scala, Amenaide-Salome Jicia, Tancredi-Marie-Nicole Lemieux, Orbazzano-Ugo Guagliardo, Isaura-        Lena Belkina, Roggiero-Blandine Staskiewicz, De Munt/La Monnaie Orchestra and Chorus, 11/10/17, http://www.urfm.braidense.it/rd/04966.pdf

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Un ballo in maschera @ De Munt/La Monnaie

ballo_maschera_091-1024x614In an interview Alex Ollé from La Fura dels Baus declares that he expected a more political dimension in the libretto of Un ballo in maschera. He sees conspiracy and political intriguing in it. He states that if Verdi would have been able to write the plot as he wished the libretto would contain more politcis. Ehmmm, really?…. In a letter to his librettist Antonio Somma we find him describing the subject for his new opera: Un soggetto bello, originale, interessante, con bellissime situazioni ed appassionato: passioni sopra tutto!…». So passions above all. In a subsequent letter he requires a libretto which is: «quieto, semplice, tenero: una specie di Sonnambula senz’essere un’imitazione della Sonnambula», “calm, simple and sweet: like a Sonnambula withouth being an imitation of Sonnambula“. No politics. However what Alex Ollé does well is to add a dramaturgic parallel without deranging the plot. Sure, Orwell’s 1984 isn’t a complete mismatch, under the totalitarian government of Riccardo (but then I tend to disagree, didn’t Verdi want to picture him as wise and enlightened?), just a bit monotone with its mask, its grey concrete slabs etc.

The singers were all honest professionals with adequate voices and Carlo Rizzi directed with insight as much as the score allowed. All in all a satisfactory evening on which I have to agree with the two ladies next to me, which stated “..not too bad this Ballo, compared to the things we usually see in Brussels” 🙂

Concept-Alex Ollé, Music direction-Carlo Rizzi, Staging collaboration-Valentina Carrasco, Set design-Alfons Flores, Costumes-Lluc Castells, Lighting-Urs Schönebaum, Video-Emmanuel Carlier, Gustav III-Stefano Secco, René Ankarström-George Petean, Amelia-Maria José Siri, Ulrica-Marie-Nicole Lemieux, Oscar-Kathleen Kim, Cristiano-Roberto Accurso, Ribbing-Tijl Faveyts, Horn-Carlo Cigni, Un giudice-Zeno Popescu, Un servo-Pierre Derhet